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Robert Hughes - *The Mona Lisa Curse 

Documentary that centers mostly upon art, its commodification and the relationship(s) between art collectors and artists and the specks of people who make so much money out of this business. 

On a side note, why do I always do this just before my art paper…






"The long day closes.

      —










thefantastician:

When you see something scary but awesome so you don’t wanna look away

thefantastician:

When you see something scary but awesome so you don’t wanna look away






"The moral life of man forms part of the subject-matter of the artist, but the morality of art consists in the perfect use of an imperfect medium.

      — Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)





Mario Zucca's work 






jyxchen:

Y.X.Chen
Tumblr.
Facebook.

jyxchen:

Y.X.Chen

Tumblr.

Facebook.











minimalius:

tssbnchn:

Studies on paper - [17 x 24 cm]
Tássia Bianchini

+ black and white // minimal +

minimalius:

tssbnchn:

Studies on paper - [17 x 24 cm]

Tássia Bianchini

+ black and white // minimal +






scienceyoucanlove:

Kaleidoscopic Cats

Famous for his humorous portrayal of cats, English Edwardian artist Louis Wain battled with mental illness throughout his life. Pictured here are six cats he painted, which psychiatrist Walter Maclay arranged into a series (top left to bottom right) that in his view illustrated Wain’s deterioration. Whether Wain (1860-1939) suffered from the disorder we now call schizophrenia (a term first used in 1908) is still a matter for debate. However, a biological explanation linking creativity and mental illness is beginning to emerge. One example includes a variant of the neuregulin 1 gene. In humans this is linked to psychosis, but it also correlates with creativity in people of high intellectual and academic ability. This observation, while helping to dispel some of the myths surrounding mental illness, may go some way to explaining why psychotic disorders prevail across generations.
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Kaleidoscopic Cats

Famous for his humorous portrayal of cats, English Edwardian artist Louis Wain battled with mental illness throughout his life. Pictured here are six cats he painted, which psychiatrist Walter Maclay arranged into a series (top left to bottom right) that in his view illustrated Wain’s deterioration. Whether Wain (1860-1939) suffered from the disorder we now call schizophrenia (a term first used in 1908) is still a matter for debate. However, a biological explanation linking creativity and mental illness is beginning to emerge. One example includes a variant of the neuregulin 1 gene. In humans this is linked to psychosis, but it also correlates with creativity in people of high intellectual and academic ability. This observation, while helping to dispel some of the myths surrounding mental illness, may go some way to explaining why psychotic disorders prevail across generations.

source